In the Fog

Burying his mom was the hardest thing he had had to do since…well, since burying his dad 25 years earlier.

Now, 6 days post-funeral he is back in the office.  He thinks to himself, “Things seem so clear…” but everyone around him is thinking, “His head is not quite right yet.”  And why should it be?  6 days ago he stood beside his brothers and sisters as they lowered the matriarch of the family, the most constant and consistent part of their lives, into the ground alongside their dad.  Things were different.  They were orphans now.

He has been about his work since his return, glad to have the distraction however there is no escaping those moments when he is alone with his thoughts.  Thoughts that don’t just creep up on him, they rush his mind like an invading army of Huns.

He is solid; mentally, emotionally, spiritually tough.  The way his mom was.  One of the traits that they had in common.  One of the many.  Mom was caring, but transparent.  You knew that she loved you, but you also knew what she thought about you, your friends, your choices…  That integrity, the fact that right or wrong you knew where you stood with her, was a turnoff to some but he had always found it refreshing.  He thought to himself, “Mom’s integrity, dad’s charm.  A golden combination.”foggy-cemetery-01032017

He hadn’t been sleeping well since the funeral, but he found himself feeling well-rested.  Since mom died on Christmas Day, the year-end business that had to be done was a week behind so there was some stress in his world however, he found that in spite of the presence of stress he wasn’t necessarily “stressed”.  This had not been the case just 7 days ago.

So now he is wondering if he is in a fog?  Nah!  He knew the difference between “intensity” and just being “tense”.  He is aware of his circumstances, he knows what needs to be done and what has to be done, and he knows the difference.  He knows you can maintain your “edge” without being “edgy”.

Clarity of mind and purpose; this was his meditation each day, and he felt as clear about where he was and where he was headed as he had in a long, long time.

But he also realizes that you can achieve clarity within the fog.

  • Big Wave Davedavid on Sea-doo
  • Trainer-Mentor-Coach
  • (469) 939-0410 Mobile
  • dscarguytx@gmail.com

Have a Plan?

worst-of-2016

No matter how your 2016 went (or didn’t go) the question we all have to ask ourselves is, “What is my plan to make 2017 better than 2016?”

Maybe your 2016 was a matter of being out-performed by the competition.  Maybe 2016 could have been better if you had anticipated some critical changes to your industry or the market, and had been better prepared.

Maybe 2016 is a blur for you because you weren’t paying attention for one reason or the other.

Regardless of how you feel about your 2016 if you don’t have a plan for 2017 you are probably going to get more of the same.

We’re not talking about making New Years resolutions, we’re talking about figuring out what “success” is going to look like for you in 2017 and developing a strategy for realizing that success.

  1. Where do you want to be at the end of 2017?
  2. What do you want to have at the end of 2017?
  3. What do you have to do in 2017?
  4. What do you want to do in 2017?
  5. Who’s assistance is necessary for your success in 2017?
  6. Who do you need to get out of your way in 2017?
  7. What obstacles are in your way in 2017?
  8. What advantages do you have on your side in 2017?

Hope is not a strategy.  If we are going to get what we want, live the life that we want, have the relationships that we want in 2017 we are going to have to have a game plan.

Not only do we have a have a strategy, we have to have the skills necessary to execute that strategy, so part of our plan for 2017 needs to be ways that we intend to sharpen our skills and abilities.

Essentially, we have to figure out what it takes to get what we want and do those things every day.  We can’t take a day off from living into our purpose and executing our plan.

  • Big Wave Davedavid on Sea-doo
  • Trainer-Mentor-Coach
  • 469-939-0410 Mobile
  • dscarguytx@gmail.com

JANUARY 1: LESSONS LEARNED THROUGH DRAMATIC CHANGE

There were many changes for the Simpson’s in 2016.  At the beginning of the year I was the Regional Sales Manager for GM Financial; the finance arm for General Motors.  I was responsible for 187 dealers across 5 states and 5 area reps.  The job entailed a lot of travel and being in a different car dealership every day.  When I accepted this position my strategy was to build relationships with my dealers that would result in an opportunity to eventually become a General Manager.  With my territory being the Midwest, I anticipated my opportunity to be a GM to be somewhere in the Midwest as well.

At the end of the Summer last year both of my kids left to go to their perspective colleges, so Jan and I effectively became “empty-nesters”.  Having raised our kids to this point in their lives ran parallel to Jan and I achieving this point in our lives where we could accept the right position at the right dealership regardless of where it was in the country.

I flew to several dealership interviews from one side of the country to the other, and once I had made up my mind of where we were going and who we were going to work for things moved pretty quickly.  I packed everything I needed and left Jan in Dallas to get my kids off to their colleges and to pack up our apartment in preparation for a relocation.  I arrived at my new store on a Friday morning, and by 11:00 I knew I had made the wrong choice.

A week later I got on an airplane and flew back to Dallas.  Before I left the dealership parking lot I made a phone call and accepted another GM position in another part of the country.  I called Jan from the airport with the news, “Don’t stop packing, but we’re going someplace else.”  I spent the next week helping Jan pack and the next Sunday I was on another airplane headed to our new opportunity in Maryland.  That Tuesday I started my next new career at my current store.  Walking into the conference room to meet my new staff, I knew in an instant that I was home.

In the 4 months since I accepted my current position, the store I manage has made a 180 degree turn, Jan and I are closer than ever, my kids are learning how to be self-sufficient, and I am finding things out about myself that I could not have learned in any other context.

figure-playing-basketballThe first day of the new year is a great time for introspection and reflection, and looking back I am so proud of the way Jan and I have embraced this new road we are on.  I am thinking this morning of the lessons that I learned along the way.

 

 

  1. Don’t lose focus on your goals, regardless of your circumstances or your geography
  2. The most important asset in any ones life is the quality of the relationships we make along the way
  3. We are capable of more than we think we are if we focus our efforts on our strengths and passions, and are willing to do the work and invest the time
  4. A person is never too old or too stuck to reinvent themselves into the person that they know that they can be
  5. Making a mistake is never fatal, staying in those circumstances becasue it’s easier than risking another mistake is the reason most people are dissatisfied with their lives

 

  • Big Wave Davesimpson-seadoo
  • David Simpson
  • Trainer-Mentor-Coach
  • (469) 939-0410 Mobile
  • bigwavedave@oictraining.com